Categories
Holiday Themed

I’ll Never Be Your Feast of Burden

Words:  76

Average Length:  4.82

Difficulty:  2.5 out of 5

puz | pdf | solution

Here’s a gentle, Thanksgiving-themed puzzle.  Best wishes for a scrumptious, safe, and stress-resistant holiday.  Enjoy!

From the Nov. 20 Washington Post. I saw the final band in Junior High School. They played in the cafeteria. This has nothing to do with the puzzle, unless your Thanksgiving dinner turns dramatic.

Two solving notes: (1) the song at 9/25 Down is from the 1969 movie of the same name.  The movie has aged poorly, but I still love the song – all 18 minutes of it.

(2) In researching a clue for 61 Across – I ended up going with the obvious – I came across some fascinating background:  In 1939, Federated Department Stores (61A’s parent) prevailed on FDR to move Thanksgiving up a week so there’d be more time after the holiday for Christmas shopping.  The Republicans objected (shocking!), and for a couple of years there was basically a Democratic Thanksgiving and a Republican Thanksgiving.   In 1941 Congress passed a law fixing Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday in November. 

Categories
Themed

Symbolic Expressions

Words:  77 (16×15 grid)

Average Length:  5.14

Difficulty:  2-4 out of 5

The difficulty range depends on whether certain mathematical/physical symbols are all Greek to you.  Helpful hints/spoilers for the theme answers are below the photo.   I hope you enjoy the puzzle.  Next week (11/14) brings a challenging Themeless.

puz | pdf | solution

Ruins of the Library at 38 Down

HINTS/SPOILERS:

19A:  Psi is the symbol for the wave function.

26A:  Lambda is the symbol for wavelength

57A:  Rho is the symbol for density

60A:  Nu is the symbol for degrees of freedom

Categories
Holiday Themed

Sweet Puzzle, Dude

Words:  76

Average Length:  4.92

Difficulty:  2 out of 5

Analog clock (see 57 Down), Heidelberg Castle

…  is what I hope you’ll say after solving this puzzle.  If you have any extra Reese’s peanut butter cups, send them my way. 

puz | pdf | solution

Categories
Themed

Recording Artists

Words:  76

Average Length:  4.92

Difficulty:  2.5 out of 5 (easy fill and challenging theme answers)

Impressionist (see 20A) photo through the window of a Strasbourg bistro

This puzzle dares to answer the question, “What happens when great painters hear great songs?”  Please enjoy and share.  Next up (10/17) will be a Goofy Themeless.

puz | pdf | solution

Categories
Themed

IKEAn’t Believe It!

Sibelius Monument, Helsinki (See 20A)

Words:  77 (16×15 grid)

Average Length:  5.14

Difficulty:  3 out of 5

Here’s a puzzle with some punny Scandinavian humor for y’all.  Want some more?  Why do Norwegians put bar codes on their military ships?  So they can Scan-de-navy-in! 

Please solve, enjoy, and share.  Next up will be a challenging themeless.  Stay tuned!

puz | pdf | solution

20A:  The country in this answer is sort of Scandinavian, at least according to Wikipedia.

66A:  Ok, the language isn’t Scandinavian, but the composer is, and I wanted 5 theme answers, so there.

13D:  Sorry for the obscure answer.  As an avid reader of Scottish crime fiction (especially Ian Rankin) and an equally avid consumer of Scotch whisky (especially Balvenie), the quote has been rattling around in my brain for a while.

53D:  This is the end of Donne’s famous “No man is an island” poem.

Categories
Themed

Alas, Modest Mouse Didn’t Make the Cut

“Some wooden dwellings” (66A) – Rurbos (summer homes), Nusfjord, Norway

G’day!  I’ve been wanting to put 1/7 Across – a fantastic, not nearly well-known enough Australian band — in a grid for a long time and came up with a theme where they’re a natural.  Enjoy the solve, share the grid.  Next up will be a tough themeless.

Words:  75

Average Length:  4.77

Difficulty:  3 out of 5

puz | pdf | solution

(The title reflects the fact that Modest Mouse was a fourth theme answer in an earlier draft of the puzzle.  I didn’t like a lot of my fill so I started over and found the puzzle worked better with only three theme answers (plus the revealer).  My apologies to this very fine band.)

1/7A:  Australia and Canada must lead the world in per-capita production of terrific music.  Whenever I listen to this band I’m smiling and ready to dance. They are amazing musicians, adept in any genre, who write irrepressible songs about loving life and not taking yourself too seriously. Here is a link to their YouTube page.  One day when the world is “normal” again, I will visit Australia and time my stay to catch one of their shows. 

22/24/25A:  Despite having surprisingly few #1s, this band has as strong and deep a catalog as any of their contemporaries. 

56D: I like The Royal Scam even better.

Categories
Holiday Themed

Limning Labor Day

Word Count:  76

Average Length:  5.03

Difficulty:  2/5

Here’s a gentle puzzle celebrating labor organizers and the power of unions, as told in songs, a movie, a book, and a Broadway show.  (Fear not, next up will be a challenging themeless, followed by a music-related puzzle featuring a great Australian band that too few people in the US know.) Enjoy and share!

puz | pdf | solution

The 47D, as seen from the ruins of the home of Cleopatra and Deskoridis on the island of Delos

15A:  I had to give Bruce first mention in the theme fill. He’s written several other songs that more directly address workers and unions, but those either are not as well known as the answer or not grid-construction friendly.

39A This is the latest of so many wonderful books from Jess Walter.

51A:  The most famous version of this song was recorded by Paul Robeson.  Here’s a link to a version sung by Springsteen in concert:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2UF8yw89yE.

6D:  Backman is another of my favorite authors.  He’s gentle, humane, humorous, and quietly inspirational.

Entire SE corner:  Oy.   I’d had a hard time filling the SE but finally achieved something I was reasonably happy with, only to realize – after sending it to my son to test-solve – that I’d placed the theme answer (currently 68A) asymmetrically (at 64A).  Fortunately, when I ripped out the whole corner and started over, it proved easier to fill as properly configured, although 56D and 61A aren’t ideal.  I re-clued the corner and was about to send it back to my son when something told me to make sure my clue for 56D was correct.  It wasn’t.  I’d clued it by reference to the homonymous coffee company (I really like their Major Dickason’s Blend).  The coffee company, however, is spelled differently.  Hence the plural name, which I try to avoid

Categories
Themed

The Case of the Missing Canines

puz | pdf | solution

Word Count:  74

Average Length:  5.00

Difficulty:  2.5/5

This is a freshly updated version of a puzzle I constructed almost 10 years ago. It’s pinch-hitting for the puzzle I had planned to post today, which I decided was not ready for prime time.  Enjoy, share, etc.; you know the drill.

14 Across

41A:  This factoid never ceases to amaze me.  Democritus lived 2500 years ago!

43D:  I realize this is a little obscure, but he’s a wonderful, widely respected player who transcends several genres of jazz.

54A/55D:  In the original version of this puzzle, the intersection of these clues was a “T” and the down clue was “Mitt’s son”.  Way back in 2012, Romney’s son’s name was widely known; after all, his father was running for President.  Today I’m sure no one remembers him (the son, not the father).  Felicitously, the company referenced in the revised entry/clue is now a big deal; in 2012 it was just 3 years old and much smaller.

Categories
Themed

A Cruciverbalist’s Travails

puz | pdf | solution

Words:  76

Average Length:  4.87

Difficulty:  3.5 out of 5

Typical Tuscan landscape – olive trees in the foreground, a vineyard tucked behind them, and cypress trees in the mid-background (see 65A)

Here’s a little crossword humor for y’all.  How little?  You decide – and if you find the puzzle amusing, please spread the word about both the puzzle and this web site! 

I have a few JeffsPuzzles.com caps left, so please email me at JeffsPuzzles@gmail.com if you’d like one sent your way (for free).

Just a couple of notes on today’s grid: 

10A:  We have a running joke/lament in our family that whenever we become enamored with a product, it gets discontinued.  Most sorely missed:  Kellogg’s Product 19, which despite the clinical name was really, really good. 

50A:  If you’re not familiar with the [ANSWER] variety puzzle, they’re tremendous fun.  Unfortunately, I can’t explain them here without giving away the answer.  All I can say is I solve the ones from Andrew Ries every week (they come out every Tuesday, followed by a tough themeless every Wednesday) and they provide a great mental workout.  His site – ariespuzzles.com – is by subscription but well worth it if you’re up for a challenge.

Categories
Themed

“Every One of Them Words Rang True”

puz | pdf | solution

Word Count:  72

Average Length:  5.00

Difficulty:  4 out of 5

This has nothing to do with the puzzle, but permit me to introduce my dog, Max. The squirrel got away.

The title phrase, if you don’t recognize it, is a line in this puzzle’s revealer.  I hope you enjoy the puzzle and share it far and wide. (I had intended to include a PuzzleMe option but I couldn’t get it to work. So, a question for other constructors: do I need an upgraded WordPress account for iframes to work? I just have the basic level.)

14A:  Friends tell me my house has walls and furniture galore in this color.  Being colorblind, I take their word for it.  And my wife, to her delight, has free rein on all color decisions.

20A:  Also the title of an irrepressibly catchy tune from Reel Big Fish.

40A: The great Mario Vargas Llosa called this publication “…the most serious, authoritative, witty, diverse and stimulating cultural publication in all the five languages I speak.”